What’s really happening with the rights and rates of British Columbians?

The timeline below highlights key milestones that have led to ICBC’s recent “dumpster fire”, actions taken by others in response, and upcoming changes announced by the B.C. Government that will impact the rights and rates of individuals in B.C.

1974

ICBC established in B.C.

ICBC is established to provide universal and affordable automobile insurance in BC by operating on a non-profit, break-even basis. British Columbians injured on the road are afforded the right to access justice and receive fair compensation based on their unique needs as an individual. Under this system, good drivers do not pay for the negligence of bad drivers.

1997

ICBC burdened with significant expenses

Driver Licensing (formerly Motor Vehicle Branch) responsibilities and associated costs were permanently transferred from the government to ICBC. The onus on ICBC is significant. In 2016 alone, ICBC spent $70M on driver licensing and testing services yet the revenues generated by these services are not returned to ICBC.

2010

$778 million taken from ICBC

ICBC has been consistently profitable for a number of years. As a result, the B.C. Government announced their plan to transfer $778M away from ICBC over three years.

2015

$1.2 billion taken from ICBC

The B.C. Government continued to transfer excess profits away from ICBC, totaling $1.2B between 2010 and 2015.

2016

ICBC reports $533 million loss

ICBC reports a loss of more than half-a-billion dollars. At the time, that loss was the largest annual loss in ICBC’s history.

July 2017

British Columbians face massive insurance rate hikes

On July 24, 2017 an independent third-party review of ICBC is released. It outlines the mounting pressures facing the insurance system and details several drastic measures that could be taken to avoid rate increases of up to 30 per cent. Restricting the rights of British Columbians through “minor injury” caps is one of the report’s options.

Full report

August 04, 2017: B.C. Government vows to clean up ICBC mess, considers harmful “minor injury” caps

December 2017

R.O.A.D. BC coalition formed

In response to the growing threat of harmful and arbitrary “minor injury” caps, R.O.A.D. BC (Rights Over Arbitrary Decisions for British Columbians) is formed to stand up for the rights of British Columbians and to ensure accountability for ICBC.

December 01, 2017: R.O.A.D. BC is formed

January 15, 2018: R.O.A.D. BC launches an online petition defending the rights of British Columbians and saying “no to injury caps”

January 2018

ICBC projects $1.3 billion loss

ICBC announces a projected net loss of $1.3B for the previous year (2017) prompting the B.C. Government to refer to the situation at ICBC as a “dumpster fire” and to further consider drastically restricting the rights of British Columbians with “minor injury” caps.

January 28, 2018: ICBC shouldn’t decide what’s “minor” for you, and it certainly shouldn’t decide what’s best for B.C.

January 30, 2018: Capping ICBC payouts isn’t the answer, says advocacy group

February 2018

B.C. Government & ICBC announce drastic changes

In a rash and irresponsible move, the B.C. Government announced ill-advised policy changes introducing harmful “minor injury” caps and removing the jurisdiction of B.C.’s court system from a significant number of claims to an online, un-tested Civil Resolutions Tribunal. The announcement ignores a growing number of concerned British Columbians who have spoken out against restrictions on their rights.

B.C. Government Release

February 6, 2018: Government of B.C. recklessly chose to limit the rights of British Columbians

February 7, 2018: “They are making the victim the problem by capping this,” said Louise Craig, spokesperson for ROAD BC

April 2018

B.C. Government introduces legislation

The B.C. Government tabled legislation (Bills 20 and 22) to introduce injury caps on what ICBC will have the power to define as “minor injuries” and to remove the jurisdiction of B.C.’s court system from a significant number of claims to an online, un-tested Civil Resolutions Tribunal. This legislation gives ICBC even more power and less accountability.

B.C. Government Release

April 23, 2018: R.O.A.D. BC coalition calls for justice for those injured on B.C.’s roads

April 24, 2018: Vaughn Palmer: New ICBC legislation will face inevitable legal challenge

May 04, 2018: British Columbia Psychological Association opposes the classification of psychological and psychiatric conditions as “minor injuries” in ICBC legislation

May 06, 2018: ICBC injury cap could punish victims instead of bad drivers: advocates

April – May, 2018

Rallies staged across B.C.

British Columbians stage a series of rallies in response to the B.C. Government’s decision to introduce harmful “minor injury” caps and restrict the rights of individuals in B.C.

April 05, 2018: A rally was held in front of MLA Jagrup Brar’s office in Surrey

May 05, 2018: More than 200 people attended a rally held outside the Surrey office of MLA Jinny Sims

May 23, 2018: A rally was held outside Attorney General David Eby’s office in Point Grey

May 07, 2018

More than 18,000 British Columbians speak out

R.O.A.D. BC delivers a petition opposing harmful “minor injury” caps to Attorney General David Eby’s office. The petition was signed by more than 18,000 British Columbians who say no to injury caps in B.C.

Petition Drop Video

May 2018 – March 2019

“Minor Injury” caps & Civil Resolutions Tribunal become law

Bills 20 & 22 became law on May 17, 2018, receiving royal assent. Forthcoming regulations need to be drafted specific to ICBC under Bills 20 and 22. The definition of “minor injury” and scope of the jurisdiction of the Civil Resolutions Tribunal will be among the specific matters addressed. Stakeholders, such as doctors and therapists and victim’s rights groups should have the opportunity to provide input in a transparent and fair process.

June 29, 2018: Calls for more transparent consultation, changes to the definition of a “minor injury” to make it simpler and easier to understand and to exclude mental health conditions are among a number of recommendations submitted to Government in a 26-page paper.

April 01, 2019

Changes to ICBC take effect

“Minor injury” caps and the Civil Resolutions Tribunal take effect, impacting the rights of British Columbians and giving ICBC even more power.

What’s really happening with the rights and rates of British Columbians?

The timeline below highlights key milestones that have led to ICBC’s recent “dumpster fire”, actions taken by others in response, and upcoming changes announced by the B.C. Government that will impact the rights and rates of individuals in B.C.

1974

ICBC established in B.C.

ICBC is established to provide universal and affordable automobile insurance in BC by operating on a non-profit, break-even basis. British Columbians injured on the road are afforded the right to access justice and receive fair compensation based on their unique needs as an individual. Under this system, good drivers do not pay for the negligence of bad drivers.

1997

ICBC burdened with significant expenses

Driver Licensing (formerly Motor Vehicle Branch) responsibilities and associated costs were permanently transferred from the government to ICBC. The onus on ICBC is significant. In 2016 alone, ICBC spent $70M on driver licensing and testing services yet the revenues generated by these services are not returned to ICBC.

2010

$778 million taken from ICBC

ICBC has been consistently profitable for a number of years. As a result, the B.C. Government announced their plan to transfer $778M away from ICBC over three years.

2015

$1.2 billion taken from ICBC

The B.C. Government continued to transfer excess profits away from ICBC, totaling $1.2B between 2010 and 2015.

2016

ICBC reports $533 million loss

ICBC reports a loss of more than half-a-billion dollars. At the time, that loss was the largest annual loss in ICBC’s history.

July 2017

British Columbians face massive insurance rate hikes

On July 24, 2017 an independent third-party review of ICBC is released. It outlines the mounting pressures facing the insurance system and details several drastic measures that could be taken to avoid rate increases of up to 30 per cent. Restricting the rights of British Columbians through “minor injury” caps is one of the report’s options.

Full report

August 04, 2017: B.C. Government vows to clean up ICBC mess, considers harmful “minor injury” caps

December 2017

R.O.A.D. BC coalition formed

In response to the growing threat of harmful and arbitrary “minor injury” caps, R.O.A.D. BC (Rights Over Arbitrary Decisions for British Columbians) is formed to stand up for the rights of British Columbians and to ensure accountability for ICBC.

December 01, 2017: R.O.A.D. BC is formed

January 15, 2018: R.O.A.D. BC launches an online petition defending the rights of British Columbians and saying “no to injury caps”

January 2018

ICBC projects $1.3 billion loss

ICBC announces a projected net loss of $1.3B for the previous year (2017) prompting the B.C. Government to refer to the situation at ICBC as a “dumpster fire” and to further consider drastically restricting the rights of British Columbians with “minor injury” caps.

January 28, 2018: ICBC shouldn’t decide what’s “minor” for you, and it certainly shouldn’t decide what’s best for B.C.

January 30, 2018: Capping ICBC payouts isn’t the answer, says advocacy group

February 2018

B.C. Government & ICBC announce drastic changes

In a rash and irresponsible move, the B.C. Government announced ill-advised policy changes introducing harmful “minor injury” caps and removing the jurisdiction of B.C.’s court system from a significant number of claims to an online, un-tested Civil Resolutions Tribunal. The announcement ignores a growing number of concerned British Columbians who have spoken out against restrictions on their rights.

B.C. Government Release

February 6, 2018: Government of B.C. recklessly chose to limit the rights of British Columbians

February 7, 2018: “They are making the victim the problem by capping this,” said Louise Craig, spokesperson for ROAD BC

April 2018

B.C. Government introduces legislation

The B.C. Government tabled legislation (Bills 20 and 22) to introduce injury caps on what ICBC will have the power to define as “minor injuries” and to remove the jurisdiction of B.C.’s court system from a significant number of claims to an online, un-tested Civil Resolutions Tribunal. This legislation gives ICBC even more power and less accountability.

B.C. Government Release

April 23, 2018: R.O.A.D. BC coalition calls for justice for those injured on B.C.’s roads

April 24, 2018: Vaughn Palmer: New ICBC legislation will face inevitable legal challenge

May 04, 2018: British Columbia Psychological Association opposes the classification of psychological and psychiatric conditions as “minor injuries” in ICBC legislation

May 06, 2018: ICBC injury cap could punish victims instead of bad drivers: advocates

April – May, 2018

Rallies staged across B.C.

British Columbians stage a series of rallies in response to the B.C. Government’s decision to introduce harmful “minor injury” caps and restrict the rights of individuals in B.C.

April 05, 2018: A rally was held in front of MLA Jagrup Brar’s office in Surrey

May 05, 2018: More than 200 people attended a rally held outside the Surrey office of MLA Jinny Sims

May 23, 2018: A rally was held outside Attorney General David Eby’s office in Point Grey

May 07, 2018

More than 18,000 British Columbians speak out

R.O.A.D. BC delivers a petition opposing harmful “minor injury” caps to Attorney General David Eby’s office. The petition was signed by more than 18,000 British Columbians who say no to injury caps in B.C.

Petition Drop Video

May 2018 – March 2019

“Minor Injury” caps & Civil Resolutions Tribunal become law

Bills 20 & 22 became law on May 17, 2018, receiving royal assent. Forthcoming regulations need to be drafted specific to ICBC under Bills 20 and 22. The definition of “minor injury” and scope of the jurisdiction of the Civil Resolutions Tribunal will be among the specific matters addressed. Stakeholders, such as doctors and therapists and victim’s rights groups should have the opportunity to provide input in a transparent and fair process.

June 29, 2018: Calls for more transparent consultation, changes to the definition of a “minor injury” to make it simpler and easier to understand and to exclude mental health conditions are among a number of recommendations submitted to Government in a 26-page paper.

April 01, 2019

Changes to ICBC take effect

“Minor injury” caps and the Civil Resolutions Tribunal take effect, impacting the rights of British Columbians and giving ICBC even more power.

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